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ExBuckeye kicking away with Crew

Eric Brunner knows how to perform well for his team, past and present. Just two years ago, the starting Columbus Crew defender was leading the Ohio State men’s soccer team to the 2007 NCAA College Cup National Championship and its winningest season in program history as a senior team captain. Today, the native of Dublin, Ohio prepares with the rest of the black and gold for the CONCACAF Champions League matchup vs. Saprissa of Costa Rica in an 8 p.m. kickoff at Crew Stadium. A Crew victory will advance the team through group play into the quarterfinals of the International Championship League. Between the Champions League and MLS play, the Crew is in the process of completing seven matches in 21 days, and Brunner has done his part. Last Saturday, in MLS play, Columbus (12-4-10) defeated the Los Angeles Galaxy, 2-0, in front of a sell-out crowd to remain at the top of the Eastern Conference and continue its MLS-record home unbeaten streak to 24 matches. En route to the Crew’s eighth shutout of the season, in the 59th minute, Brunner blasted an 80-yard ball down the left side where forward Emilio Renteria ran onto the pass and headed into the penalty area to set up the final goal of the match. “They’re a really good team,” Brunner, who has started 20 games for the Crew in 2009, said. “They’ve had some great results this year and only lost a handful of games this season and we knew they were going to come in tough. We just wanted to out-work them and let the ball do the work on a fast pitch.” Winning matches with a complete team effort has been the name of the game for the defending MLS champions. Columbus Crew coach Robert Warzycha’s plan coming into the final month of regular-season play is making sure his players are well rested and ready to compete when their numbers are called. “We have a very important game against Saprissa,” Warzycha said. “We don’t have a reserve on the team. Everybody here on this club is contributing. We have a very deep squad. I can go with any player and as long as we are playing as a team, we can be very successful.” This game is crucial for both teams. In the Champions League standings in Group C, the Crew (2-2-0) sits in second with six points, while Saprissa (1-2-1) follows in third with four points. Earlier this month, on Sept. 16, the Crew defeated Saprissa on the road 1-0, and look forward to continued success against its group opponent. The 23-year-old Brunner, a former first-team All-Big Ten and NSCAA first-team All-American with the Buckeyes, will consistently have an impact stopping opposing forwards, and as shown over the weekend can make game-changing plays for the offense. The Crew returns to MLS play 7:30 p.m. Saturday against the Seattle Sounders FC at Crew Stadium to complete a four-match home swing. read more

Oftoverlooked Lauderdale a driving force for Buckeye offense

Playing in a rotation alongside three of the top 35 scorers in school history and three players who have won a combined 10 Big Ten Freshman of the Week awards this season, it can be easy to overlook what Ohio State senior center Dallas Lauderdale can bring to the No. 1-ranked team in the nation. But there was Lauderdale, fresh off playing just nine and seven minutes in the Buckeyes’ past two games, respectively, jump-starting OSU’s offense in the opening moments of the Buckeyes’ 70-48 win against Iowa on Wednesday. After committing a turnover on OSU’s opening possession, the senior from Solon, Ohio, bounced back with a pair of dunks on the Buckeyes’ following two possessions, giving OSU a 4-0 lead in the process. Iowa coach Fran McCaffery said it would be easy to forget about Lauderdale when faced with the talent that the OSU roster possesses. “They run their plays for everybody else, but he scores as a byproduct of so much other offensive talent and the fact that we were having trouble guarding those guys,” McCaffery said. “That’s how he hurts you. He hurts you with blocked shots. He hurts with his physical presence and rebounding. And then he hurts you when he hides around the basket and catches and dunks. It wasn’t like they were going to him.” OSU senior guard David Lighty credited Lauderdale’s quick start — on both ends of the floor — as a reason for the Buckeyes’ 22-point victory. “That gave us a big lift. I mean, he’s our key guy in the middle, especially on the defensive end,” Lighty said. “Him coming in and rebounding and getting easy buckets and holding down the paint for us in the middle is something that pretty much got us all started. It’s probably why we all played great defense today.” Playing 14 minutes Wednesday, the most he’s played since Jan. 4, Lauderdale scored nine points on 4-of-4 shooting, grabbed two rebounds and blocked one shot. Lauderdale’s nine points pushed his career scoring total to 508 points. On one particular sequence early in the second half, Lauderdale showcased his value to the Buckeyes as he blocked a shot out of bounds, contested a missed 3-point attempt and finished with a dunk on the other end of the court, stretching the OSU lead to 47-25. Despite Lauderdale’s playing time being decreased by an average of more than six minutes per game this season, OSU coach Thad Matta said the Buckeyes will continue to rely on Lauderdale as they enter the heart of Big Ten play. “Defensively, to start the game, he was as good as he’s ever been just with his energy and his movement and that sort of thing,” Matta said. “That’s the level we need him at.” read more

Senate NDAA Includes Raise in Military Pay Privatized Housing Reforms

first_imgThe GOP-led Senate Armed Services Committee advanced its version of the fiscal 2020 National Defense Authorization Act Wednesday, authorizing $750 billion in defense spending while departing from the White House on how some DOD funding is allocated.The measure aligns with President Donald Trump’s overall fiscal 2020 defense request, but notably reduced from $164 billion to $75 billion his request for uncapped overseas contingency funds, according to a bill summary released Thursday.The committee authorized a base budget of $642.5 billion and $23.2 billion for Department of Energy national security programs. It also authorized $8.4 billion in defense-related spending.Military construction accounts were also authorized $3.6 billion to replenish funding that had been redirected toward a southern border barrier.Other authorizations included:An additional 7,700 troops and a 3.1% military pay raise$40 million for educational agencies supporting children of military families and $10 million for schools supporting severely disabled military children.Military privatized housing reforms, including pulling some funding from private contractors and redirecting it toward installation housing improvements.Approval to move forward with creating the administration’s proposed space force.$10 billion for 94 fifth-generation Lockheed-Martin F-35s, 16 more than the administration requested.$948 million for eight Boeing F-15EXs, matching the Air Force’s request.$24.1 billion to buy 12 new battleships matching shipbuilding funding for fiscal 2019.The NDAA process next moves to the House where it will mark up its own annual defense policy bill in early June. It then moves to a House-Senate conference the second week of June.ADC’s 2019 Defense Communities National Summit, June 10-12, features a keynote and a follow-up NDAA Q&A session Tues., June 11, “Are We Ready: The State of Our Defense Readiness,” with Armed Services Readiness subcommittee chairman John Garamendi (D-Calif.) and ranking member Doug Lamborn (R-Colo). ADC AUTHORlast_img read more

Standard Chartered Ruias create hurdle in ArcelorMittals India expansion

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French Croatian delicacies to entice foodies on Sunday at Café Ekante

first_imgKolkata: Want to enjoy French and Croatian cuisine? Café Ekante in New Town has made an elaborate arrangement to welcome its guests to enjoy quality food and the FIFA World Cup 2018 final on Sunday.The guests can enjoy the game on a big screen, while enjoying French and Croatian special dishes. The final between France and Croatia will start at 8.30 pm. The welcome drinks include Snipper Modrij and Young Embapa. As starters, the guests can have cheese, corn nuggets and fish rolls stuffed with spinach and mushroom sauce. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedIn the main course there will be caesar salad, green bouquet with French dressing, grilled chicken with reduced espagnole sauce, seafood pasta agloi polio, bread roll and butter, sauce vegetable, herbed rice and caramel custard. The dishes will cost Rs 500 plus 5% GST. Café Ekante, named by Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, has celebrated World Cup 2018 in a befitting manner for the past one month. The restaurant has been decorated with jerseys and footballs. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPThere is a mini goalpost and the guests who can score two goals, will get a discount on their food bill. Those who can predict the name of the winning team, will get a 20% discount on the food bill, which will be valid for one month from the date of the final match. Experts chefs have supervised cooking of the French and Croatian cuisines. Café Ekante has become popular in New Town and its neighbourhoods, as well as in Kolkata. Getting a seat on Saturdays and Sundays is quite difficult. The ambience and food have become popular among foodies. During the World Cup, there were special dishes every day on the countries that were participating in the matches. For example, on the day when England faced Croatia, there was fish and chips on offer.last_img read more

How can this be The reason is shale oil The su

first_img How can this be? The reason is shale oil. The success of the shale oil sector—specifically horizontal drilling and fracking shale—has caused a significant increase in domestic US production. This is nothing new, and certainly isn’t a surprise to our subscribers. But what is interesting was Saudi Arabia’s reaction to the increase in domestic US production. The United States had been Saudi Arabia’s largest oil customer… until the US Fed’s quantitative easing policy created cheap money, which fueled the shale revolution in the US. Today, China is Saudi Arabia’s new best friend. The Saudis cut the spot price of oil to China and caused a significant whiplash in oil prices, which sent international oil markets from US$95 a barrel to below USD$85 a barrel. According to the EIA, China is expected to surpass the US as the world’s largest oil importer by the end of 2014. Cripple ISIS—ISIS funds everything with black-market oil; so as oil becomes cheaper, there’s less money for the group In the last 35 years, world oil consumption growth has gone into negative growth (meaning below zero growth—meaning world uses less oil) only twice. The first was the 1980s recession; the second instance was the global financial crisis of late 2008. But during both times, the US was without a doubt the world’s largest consumer and importer of oil. Essentially, the world consumption of oil is directly and positively correlated with the real US GDP. In fact, the correlation is +0.99, which is about as good as it gets when it comes to correlation coefficients. However, horizontal drilling and fracking has increased US domestic oil production, and as a result, US net imports as a share of consumption are at their lowest level in 29 years. Over the last 35 years, China has awakened and has become a game changer in the global energy markets. It will continue to play that role. According to the EIA, China is well on its way to becoming the world’s largest importer of oil. Preorder The Colder War Now Marin Katusa Chief Energy Investment Strategist Casey Research China consumes about 11 million  bopd—and it’s expected to match US consumption by 2030. However, the growth of the US domestic oil production from shale oil is not cheap oil production… and shale oil comes with a high decline in production. What Happens to US Domestic Oil Production at $75 Oil? On average, an Eagle Ford or Bakken shale oil well needs US$55-$70 oil to make a decent profit, in order to continue drilling to replace the decline rates of existing shale oil wells. Many other shale oil formations need higher than $70 oil to break even. Thus, we can expect the incredible growth of domestic US oil production (primarily as a result of the Bakken in North Dakota and Eagle Ford in Texas) to become significantly impacted at prices below $75. This means lower domestic oil production rates, which then means importing more oil from either Canada or the Middle East. However, Canadian oil isn’t any cheaper to produce than American oil; therefore, one can expect Canadian oil growth to also start declining at $75 oil. The only blessing for Canadian producers in this scenario is a weaker Canadian dollar. This is all good news for the informed and prepared energy investor. In the September Casey Energy Report, we broke down all of the US oil producers and compared them to the Canadian oil producers, explaining the fundamental differences between the two. We’ve broken down all of the metrics company by company, and have our Buy list ready. In that report we stated that we would rather be patient than rush into a volatile sector. This month, we presented our first of three stocks that you must own in a declining oil market. These stocks will not only pay you an incredible yield, but each is the best company in its peer group in terms of metrics such as payout ratios, lowest-cost producer, and low debt. We’re excited about the market selling off and have been using $75 oil and $3 natural gas in our calculations. We’ve also stress tested every producer on both the US and Canadian stock exchanges and have our full analysis ready. In this month’s Casey Energy Report, we’ll explain to subscribers how to best position their portfolios to reap the rewards of a $75 oil price. And now, a personal note to all my readers. Over the last decade, I’ve traveled the world over trying to find the best resource investments. Some have worked out spectacularly well while others have failed, and others are still in the works. Doug Casey wanted me to write a book a few years ago, but I don’t see myself as a writer, but rather as an analyst and speculator. However, after my personal health challenges (which I’m proud to say I have under control), I thought I may want to get to my bucket list sooner than later, and the time was right for my first book. Its subject? The Colder War. The book covers many aspects of the geopolitics of energy… especially the struggle between Russia and the US to control the world’s energy trade. Some pretty influential people have endorsed my book, such as former Congressman Dr. Ron Paul, who stated: The Colder War provides a reversing contrast from the hysterical “Putin is Stalin, Jr., restart the Cold War” message emanating from the neocon think tanks and the mainstream media. Marin Katusa shows the real threat to the American people … You see, while America and the West weren’t looking, Vladimir Putin has been orchestrating a takeover of the energy sector. He has transformed Russia from a crumbling former Soviet state into an energy powerhouse to become: The second-largest oil exporter in the world, on pace to pass Saudi Arabia very soon; The largest uranium exporter in the world, powering 1 in 10 American homes; The largest natural gas exporter in the world, doling it out with an iron fist and willing to cut off supply and let harsh winters kill thousands to get its way. Russia is quickly becoming the only source for countries desperate to secure long-term supplies of energy—giving Putin more power and more leverage than ever before. Europe, Africa, and China are all dependent on Russian energy. And Putin won’t stop until he takes down the only thing standing in his way of turning Russia into a superpower: the US. Inside my book, you’ll discover that Putin is working to break the monopoly of the US dollar in the global energy trade. He’s set in motion in an ingenious yet devastating plan to do it. If Putin is successful, he could nuke the US economy and cost the average American dearly. Do you think the recent pullback in oil prices will cripple Putin? If you said yes, you’re wrong… and you really need to read my book. Friends and colleagues have told me that they’ve sat down and read it in the course of an evening. It’s that fascinating and easy to digest. Once you read it, your view of the world and the global markets will change. You might even want to call your broker the next morning—because the US has never been more vulnerable, and the stakes have never been higher… Preorder your copy of The Colder War and make sure you’re among the first to read this important book. Saudi Arabia has taken an aggressive stance in slashing prices and maintaining its market share; and as a result, other oil producers will suffer, specifically ISIS. Interestingly, there’s strong evidence suggesting that it is in fact Saudi Arabia which created the Frankenstein monster  that is today’s ISIS. Let’s take a quick look back into the region’s history. Saudi Arabia and Qatar have both funded Wahhabi Salafism under the guise of education. What is now ISIS originally took to the early teachings of Wahhabi Salafism, the goal of which is to convert Muslims and others to its “purer” form of Islam. In short, they’re extremists that make up less than 3% of the global Muslim population; this movement has been on the rise since 9/11. Now I’ll put all the pieces of the puzzle together. In the early days of the Syrian civil war, Saudi Arabian leaders were quite pleased with the initial Sunni fighters against Assad, but they weren’t happy when Russian President Vladimir Putin stood his ground and backed a longtime Russian ally in the Assad regime. Saudi Arabia tried to sway Russia to turn its back on Assad’s regime in 2013, going so far as to dangle multibillion-dollar military contracts and other financial economic “incentives”… or what’s realistically known as a bribe. Putin would have none of it. He politely rejected the Saudis offer and stood his ground, with China in Russia’s corner. Fast forward to mid-2014, and the Saudis have a Frankenstein on their hands. Its name is ISIS. Yes, ISIS is a major oil exporter in the black market. If this sounds confusing, let me take you into the dark, back alleys of the Middle East oil trade. “ISIS” stands for Islamic state of Iraq and the Levant. ISIS has been taking over oil-producing regions in Iraq and has been funding its military advances by selling oil on the black markets (specifically, in Turkey) at a discount, roughly 50,000 bopd. It’s the dark secret of the Middle East oil sector, but it’s happening. ISIS first started selling smuggled Syrian oil in Turkey, making millions a day, but Obama doesn’t want that information widely known, so it was put on the down low. Politicians in Turkey have publicly stated that ISIS has sold US$800 million worth of stolen, black-market oil in Turkey alone. ISIS then expanded into Iraq and has captured oil wells in Iraq—even the Russians have stated that ISIS has been selling “stolen” or captured oil from Iraq on the black markets. It’s much easier to sell stolen oil at a discount than oil that one produces. So what can the Saudis do to take down their own Frankenstein? The Saudis only nuclear-level weapon is oil. Having realized that China had surpassed the US as their biggest oil buyer, the Saudis decided to start taking big discounts and continuing to pump oil to increase their market share in Asia. Now the Saudis are attempting to hit four birds with one stone: Payback to Putin for supporting Assad’s regime in Syria (sub-$80 oil is bad for Russia’s GDP) Deflation [dih-fley-shuhn] Economics. a fall in the general price level or a contraction of credit and available money (opposed to inflation). Source: Dictionary.com The US Energy Information Administration (EIA) published a very compelling chart last week; it shows that the net energy imports of the US as a share of consumption are at their lowest level in 29 years. Decrease US oil prices—perhaps even slow down US domestic oil production; that would result in the US importing more Saudi oil, and help fuel global growth with cheaper oil. Don’t Mess with Putin: He Isn’t Your Regular Politician Russia isn’t cutting back its production—rather, Russia is hitting post-Soviet highs in oil production. Thus we see tumbling oil prices. But how low can this go? Let’s get back to basics of supply and demand to answer this question. Sincerely, Maintain market share—in the near term, the Saudis can absorb the lower costs (cheap conventional oil), and they definitely want to continue being the #1 supplier to China.last_img read more