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Man prosecuted for reacting to shoplifting accusation

first_img TAGSCourtDunnes StoresJetland Shopping Centrelimerick A LIMERICK man who became irate when he was accused of shoplifting despite having a receipt for the goods he purchased, has been ordered to pay €100 to the district court poor box for a breach of the peace.Stuart McNamara (23) of Kileely, Limerick had purchased some items at Dunnes Stores in the Jetland Shopping Centre on the Ennis Road.Judge Marian O’Leary heard that the father-of-two, was with his girlfriend when security staff stopped him on suspicion of shoplifting.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Although Mr McNamara produced a receipt for the goods he purchased, Gardaí were called to the store.When he protested his innocence, he became aggressive and was arrested and charged with a public order offence.Pleading guilty to the charge, defence counsel Erin O’Hagan BL said her client has apologised for his reaction. He was a recovering addict and had made strident efforts over the last number of months to right his life. He was working well with regards to his children and was free from drugs for a considerable period.Judge O’Leary ordered him to pay €100 to the court poor box adding that if he made the payment within three months, she would apply the probation act. Twitter Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Previous articleTake your partners ’round and Swing ’emNext articleDPP fails in bid to appeal Limerick drug dealer’s sentence Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie center_img Facebook Print Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Email Advertisement NewsMan prosecuted for reacting to shoplifting accusationBy Staff Reporter – March 26, 2016 990 Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WhatsApplast_img read more

More fish test positive for Sr-90, but not due to Vermont Yankee

first_imgNew fish samples taken from the Connecticut River on April 23 and analyzed by Vermont Yankee’s contract laboratory have tested positive for strontium-90 (Sr-90). Concentrations of Sr-90 detected in the inedible portions of these fish are in the range of what would be expected as a result of fallout from nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, and the Chernobyl release in 1986.Specifically, the laboratory results for Sr-90 were 70 pCi/kg from fish taken near the plant in the Vernon Pool, and 100 pCi/kg from fish taken about 5 miles upstream, near the Route 9 bridge as it crosses the river north of Brattleboro. A New York study found background levels of Sr-90 in fish to be in the range of 120 to 360 pCi/kg (see New York Fish Study below).Vermont Yankee reported these latest test results to the Health Department on June 30. The first samples of fish to be analyzed were taken in February 2010 from the same locations, and these fish also tested positive for Sr-90. In both cases, concentrations are within the expected range. Sr-90 has not been detected in edible parts of the fish. Like calcium, strontium accumulates almost entirely in bone.Because the Sr-90 results are all within what is considered to be the normal “background” range, and because no Sr-90 has been measured above the lower limit of detection in groundwater on site at the plant, the Health Department considers it unlikely that these findings in fish are a result of recent events at Vermont Yankee.Fish caught from the Connecticut River are among the many samples being analyzed for radioactive materials by the Vermont Department of Health, Vermont Yankee, and by contract laboratories employed by both.So far, soil samples analyzed by the Health Department’s contract laboratory for hard-to-detect radionuclides are the only samples to be positive for Sr-90, or for any other radioactive materials, that can associated with Vermont Yankee operations. Should other radioactive materials such as cobalt-60 or cesium-137 be detected in groundwater or fish, this would be evidence that the strontium in fish was strontium from Vermont Yankee.To date only tritium, which moves easily through the soil as tritiated water, has been detected in groundwater samples, and only in groundwater on site at Vermont Yankee. No drinking water on site or off site, nor any river water has been found to be contaminated with tritium above the laboratory’s lower limit of detection.New York Fish StudyThe amount of Sr-90 in fish as a result of nuclear weapons testing and Chernobyl is in the range of 120 to 360 pCi/kg, according to a study published by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation in November 2009: http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/materials_minerals_pdf/sr90fnlrprt.pdf(link is external)   (exit VDH)The New York study results were published after radioactive materials leaked from the Indian Point nuclear power station on the lower Hudson River. These levels, presumed to be background, are based on Sr-90 results from more than 150 fish caught about 70 miles north and upstream from the Indian Point plant.Groundwater ExtractionVermont Yankee officials have indicated that another extraction well will be in operation soon. This will be either be a new extraction well, or modification of an existing monitoring well such as GZ-15, which is located in the area of the plume that now has the highest tritium concentration. Vermont Yankee has set a goal of pumping out 300,000 gallons of tritium-contaminated groundwater. The original extraction well has so far pumped out about half that volume, and tritium concentrations in groundwater still being pumped from the original extraction well are now approaching the lower limit of detection.Monitoring Well Test Results – as of July 2, 2010For the first time, groundwater samples from well GZ-20, which is located near the condensate storage tank and northeast of the Advanced Off-Gas (AOG) pipe tunnel and drain line, are showing measurements for tritium below the lower limit of detection (This means that GZ-20, along with other wells no longer located within the plume of contamination from the AOG leak, can now serve to detect any new leaks that may occur. At the height of the AOG leak investigation, as many as 12 groundwater monitoring wells were showing tritium contamination. This week, only seven wells are showing tritium contamination above the level of detection, and only three of them–all located next to the Connecticut River–have increasing tritium concentrations. The other wells that are still contaminated have decreasing tritium concentrations. The results that follow are as reported by Vermont Yankee for tritium. To date, gamma spectroscopy and special analyses for hard to detect radionuclides have not identified any other nuclear power plant related radioactive materials in groundwater, drinking water or river water. Note that well GZ-6 which had not been sampled for about 6 weeks, is back on a weekly sampling schedule.All results are expressed in terms of picocuries per liter (pCi/l), or below the lower level of detection (GZ-1: Source: Vermont Health Department. 7.2.2010last_img read more

Giant skate bowl home sold for millions

first_img Ex Billabong head’s controversial mansion sells for record price Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58 Justyn Wood and Susan Chenoweth sold their luxury home in Hamilton that has a skate bowl in the middle of a living room. Picture: Adam HeadThe epic Brisbane home that went viral because of its giant skate bowl in the living room has sold – and you’ll never guess what the new owners plan to do with it.Industry sources say the property fetched close to its advertised listing price that was looking for offers over $2.375m. MORE: Where house prices fell most amid COVID-19center_img Riley Wood, 11, will have to say goodbye to the skate bowl now that his father, Justyn Wood, has sold the home. Picture: Adam Head.Despite the home’s unique selling point, skaters will be devastated to hear the property ended up selling to a local family with little interest in the actual skate bowl itself.Selling agent Drew Davies of Place Estate Agents had been swamped with enquiries for the house, including from professional skateboarders around the world.“They purchased it because they think that pocket of Hamilton … is so quiet, so peaceful —and the size of the block and home,” Mr Davies said.“The might keep it (the skate bowl), they might not.” The multistorey family home is located at 32 Joynt Street in Hamilton.Mr Davies said the home attracted multiple offers and interest from Olympic skateboarders, a local coffee entrepreneur and young dads keen to live out their teenage dreams.“There was far more interest than expected from people who actually wanted it for the skate bowl,” he said.The three-level house at 32 Joynt St, Hamilton, has been one of Australia’s most popular properties on realestate.com.au because of the custom-made skate bowl next to the downstairs kitchen.The house was built by former owner Robert Lewers, who founded many of Brisbane’s skate parks. The unique home has a classic facade. Inside the home has a timeless feel.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus8 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market8 hours agoThe previous owner, Justyn Wood, said the skate bowl was one of the reasons he bought the house seven years ago.“I’ve got two boys and I could just see that they would love having it,” Mr Wood said. “It takes up a fair bit of the basement level and it’s a real fun zone for kids. “It’s soundproof from the rest of the house so they can make all the noise they want down there.” The skate bowl in the basement level is soundproof so entertaining in other parts of the home is not an issue while the kids are having fun skating.American professional skateboarder Tom Schaar even used in it when he last toured Australia.Aside from the skate bowl, there is plenty to keep regular homeowners happy, including a parents’ retreat, indoor/outdoor entertaining space and walk-in wardrobes.There are also six bedrooms, three bathrooms, two carparking spaces and the property is situated just four kilometres from the CBD of Brisbane.Families can use the entire basement level as a ‘kids’ area’, as it features a spacious bedroom with built in robe, ensuite and kitchenette all with direct access to the patio and pool. Record $6.6 million sale for Gold Coast mansionlast_img read more